Blood Test Protocols

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Blood Test Protocols

Postby Birdman » Sun Mar 12, 2017 7:29 am

Hello again. Can anyone answer a question for me please? Now I am on haemo, bloods are naturally taken through the machine. The staff at my unit are absolutely wonderful, and caring beyond belief, but communication isn't a strong point. Last week they did monthly full bloods, and I knew what was going on because of the number of vials they took at the beginning and end of my session. But I didn't realise that they then did creatinine again 2 days later. I only know because I am on Patient View. My point is, they never tell me what they are taking bloods for. If I had noticed blood being taken through the machine on the second ocassion, I would have asked why. But I didn't notice. Maybe I was chatting to my neighbour at the next station.

Can anyone tell me whether it is medical protocol to tell a patient why bloods are being taken? I feel uncomfortable with not knowing what is going on.
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Re: Blood Test Protocols

Postby SKM23435 » Sun Mar 12, 2017 12:53 pm

Technically you need to give consent for a blood test to be taken. You are unable to give consent (even more so "informed consent") if you are not told that the test is being taken and what it will be tested for. You would be well within your rights to complain if tests are being taken and you are not being told what for.
As you need to have a long term working relationship with the staff on the unit maybe a quiet word with one of the more senior nurses or your consultant may help, just saying you want to be informed.
Started APD July 2014
On transplant and paired exchange lists.
Transplant 9/5/15
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Re: Blood Test Protocols

Postby Birdman » Sun Mar 12, 2017 1:15 pm

SKM23435 wrote:Technically you need to give consent for a blood test to be taken. You are unable to give consent (even more so "informed consent") if you are not told that the test is being taken and what it will be tested for. You would be well within your rights to complain if tests are being taken and you are not being told what for.
As you need to have a long term working relationship with the staff on the unit maybe a quiet word with one of the more senior nurses or your consultant may help, just saying you want to be informed.


Thank you so very much for that. I didn't realise I had to technically give permission. Of course, I would not complain, as the staff are wonderful, but I will just mention in passing now that I really do want to know what is going on and why.

Thanks again.
Birdman
 
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Re: Blood Test Protocols

Postby wagolynn » Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:46 pm

I think I have solved the problem by trying to understand the condition, and its treatment.

Watching what happens within the unit, and listening to comments in the waiting are, most patients do not want to know what is going or why.

I think of them as 'passive' patients. When I could hear reasonably well, I am now very hard of hearing but that's another story, I did manage to get some patients more interested by talking about the treatment etc.

My conclusion is, the staff might want to inform patients but in the face of disinterest there enthusiasm soon wanes, they are as human as we are.

If anyone is interested I have found these web sites very reliable sources.

http://www.kidneypatientguide.org.uk/contents.php

http://www.edren.org/pages/handbooks/unit-handbook.php
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Re: Blood Test Protocols

Postby Birdman » Mon Mar 13, 2017 6:25 am

wagolynn wrote:I think I have solved the problem by trying to understand the condition, and its treatment.

Watching what happens within the unit, and listening to comments in the waiting are, most patients do not want to know what is going or why.

I think of them as 'passive' patients. When I could hear reasonably well, I am now very hard of hearing but that's another story, I did manage to get some patients more interested by talking about the treatment etc.

My conclusion is, the staff might want to inform patients but in the face of disinterest there enthusiasm soon wanes, they are as human as we are.

If anyone is interested I have found these web sites very reliable sources.

http://www.kidneypatientguide.org.uk/contents.php

http://www.edren.org/pages/handbooks/unit-handbook.php


Thank you. I am sure you are right. But are staff under an obligation to tell patients, or at least to ask the patient if they want to know? I will ask to be told in future. As I have said, the staff are wonderful, but not beng advised what is going on worries me considerably.
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